Cannonball Read #2: The Heiress Effect, by Courtney Milan

One of the comforting things about reading romance novels is knowing that they’re going to have a happy ending. The Heiress Effect was interesting because for a while there, I honestly wasn’t sure whether Jane and Oliver would actually be able to put aside their differences long enough to find their “happily ever after” together.  Continue reading

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Cannonball Read #1: Defy, by Sara B. Larson

Sara B. Larson’s Defy tells the story of Alex Hollon, the best fighter on the prince’s royal guard. There’s just one catch, however — Alex is actually Alexa; she and her twin brother Marcel lied about her identity so she could join the army after their parents’ death at the hands of an enemy sorcerer. But Alexa’s true identity may not be as well-concealed as she thinks, and she’s not the only one with secrets. Continue reading

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Women in Science: Nobel Prizes, Part III

We’re down to the final stretch of women who have won Nobel Prizes in science. These five women are the most recent Laureates in Physiology or Medicine and have made astounding contributions to our knowledge of embryonic development, our sense of smell, HIV, and chromosome replication. Continue reading

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Roast Chicken: Have No Fear!

For some reason, roasting poultry has a bit of a reputation as being a terrifyingly difficult endeavor. The first time I cooked a turkey for Thanksgiving I was so nervous, but it actually turned out to be much easier than I thought and tasted absolutely delicious. Now my roast chickens are one of our favorite dinners. Sure, they take a little more prep work than most meals I cook, but the payoff is totally worth it. Continue reading

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Women in Science: Nobel Prizes, Part II

Two weeks ago we learned about the five extraordinary women who have won Nobel Prizes in Physics and Chemistry. There are no fewer than ten women who have been awarded for their contributions in Physiology or Medicine, so this week we’ll take a look at the first five.  Continue reading

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My Favorite Slow Cooker Burritos

Burritos are one of my favorite comfort foods. Growing up in Texas it was always easy to find good Tex-Mex, but now that I live in New York I’m pretty much stuck making my own. But with a recipe this easy and tasty, I don’t even mind! Since I use a slow cooker, there’s very little cleanup, and this recipe is really easy to adapt to your own tastes and what you have lying around the kitchen. Continue reading

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The Science of Fall Foliage

Autumn has arrived in the Northern Hemisphere, and you know what that means – the temperatures are dropping, every conceivable food and drink now comes in pumpkin flavor, and the trees are all decked out in fancy colors. But why do they do that? Science! Let’s take a closer look. Continue reading

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